Weddings at Regale

Inspired by Italian landscapes and Old-World villas, Regale Winery and Vineyards provides an opportunity to share the relaxed and sophisticated lifestyle that surrounds the production of wine in celebration of your wedding. Imagine saying your “I Dos” in the formal gardens, surrounded by lush greenery with fountains, olive trees and a bocce ball court complete with a view of the mountains. This space is perfect for an outdoor ceremony under the clear Californian sky. For your reception, you can utilize the gardens, in conjunction with the Outdoor Bar and Courtyard, which includes a covered portico with large granite tasting bar and a neighboring wood-fired pizza oven. The orchard patio offers another gorgeous outdoor space complete with market lights, trellised grape vines, and a luxurious reclaimed wood barn backdrop perfect for an outdoor reception. For a romantic and welcoming indoor affair, the second floor dining room features a vaulted travertine ceiling, Italian fresco paintings, Venetian plaster, and ornate fireplaces to create an old-world Tuscan atmosphere. The room opens onto a heated, open-air terrace with breathtaking views of the coastal range and our formal gardens. End the evening with dancing in our spacious barrel room against a backdrop of wine barrels.

 Balcony Bride Close

Regale is a truly unique, exclusive venue designed to reflect old world wineries in Italy & France.  Our lovely Italian fountains, ornate gardens, olive orchard & vineyard offer an unforgettable setting for your event.

Regale Facade      Fountain

Formal Gardens

Lush gardens with fountains, an olive orchard, open lawn space and a bocce ball court complete with a view of the mountains is a beautiful outdoor ceremony location.  For your reception following the ceremony, utilize the gardens in conjunction with our outdoor bar and courtyard which includes a covered portico with large granite tasting bar and a neighboring wood-fire pizza oven.

May-October: 100 guests maximum capacity

Novemebr-April: 75 guests maximum capacity

Bocce Bride

Ceremony Set Pano

Ceremony Reverse

Executive Dining Room/Bride’s Dressing Room

This second-story room in the villa has a working fireplace and an Italian fresco mural as well as its own private bathrooms and bar.  A beautiful space for a pre-dinner reception or a palatial bride’s room.

May-October: 100 guests maximum capacity

Novemebr-April: 75 guests maximum capacity

    Executive Dining Room Reception with Doors Executive Dining Room Reception

Bride Behind Bar

Bride Staircase     Bride Window

Veranda

This second-story enclosed veranda overlooks our formal gardens and is accessible via an exterior staircase and elevator or through the executive dining room.  This beautiful space, protected from the elements, is perfect for a reception, small seated dinner, or covered ceremony.

May-October: 100 guests maximum capacity

Novemebr-April: 75 guests maximum capacity

      Veranda ReceptionVeranda Balcony Bride

Barrel Room

Our barrel room is complete with cocktail seating and opens into the adjoining tasting room creating the perfect space for dancing after dinner, or can be utilized as a cozy interior space for meetings or dining in case of inclement weather.

May-October: 100 guests maximum capacity

Novemebr-April: 75 guests maximum capacity

Barrel Room Corner   Barrel Room Head Table

Barrel Room Pano

Orchard Patio

Our orchard patio is highlighted with trellised grape vines and fruit trees, a romantic setting for outdoor dining. The space is complete with market lights, built-in sound systerm for music or microphones, and a granite bar in a rustic barn accented with reclaimed wood.

May-October: 100 guests maximum capacity

Novemebr-April: 75 guests maximum capacity

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Photos by B. Wild Photography & Francesca Penko
Rentals by Williams Party Rentals

How-to: Blind Wine Tasting

Here at Regale, we love parties – Fresco Croppedespecially one with a good icebreaker, and, even better, something involving wine!  Might we suggest incorporating a little blind wine tasting to your family gathering, game night, company team building, or throwing a whole party aimed at getting your guests interacting with a fun blind tasting.  It will get people thinking, comparing notes, and most importantly… talking! If you are looking for a gorgeous locale as a bonus, come visit us for a private event at Regale and have a blind tasting hosted by one of our wine specialists.  It make your party an event to remember and is great to add to an offsite as a team building activity!

A How-To for a Blind Tasting Party:

The Setup

  1. Gather three-five bottles of wine (definitely throw a Regale bottling in there!) – ideally single varietal bottles from different regions and vintages. Alternatively guests can each bring a favorite mystery bottle to share.
  2. Cover and number your bottles – for our team building events at Regale we have snazzy burlap blind tasting bags printed with numbers, but you can use brown paper bags, decanters, or even wrap your bottles in aluminum foil! Remember- a bottle’s shape can be a cue towards the varietal, so keep this in mind when selecting how to disguise the bottle if your guests are wine savvy.
    IMG_1252    Blind Tasting
  3. Provide tasting cards so your guests can take notes and eventually submit their guesses.  Decide if you want to provide a key of the different offerings or leave them completely in the dark.Lepori_0383

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As guests are tasting, you can sound like an expert by reminding them of…

The Three Steps to Blind Tasting:

  1. Consider the appearance for maturity and other cues
  2. Consider the aroma for varietal cues
  3. Consider the mouth for taste, body, finish, overall quality

Step 1: Appearance – Color and Opacity

  • What color is the wine? Whites gain color as they age, reds are most vibrant when young and fade or take on a more brick color with an orange or brown hue.
  • How opaque is the wine? Can you read text through the wine or is it so opaque that light barely comes through it?

Step 2: Aroma – Smell and Physical Indicators

  • 1st Sniff – Does it remind you of varietals you have tasted in the past?
  • Shirt sniffs vs. long draws; swirling for aeration
  • Think about the descriptors:
    • F – Fruit
    • E – Earth
    • W – Wood
  • Physical reaction – Acidity (salivation), tannin (bitterness), alcohol (heat)

Step 3: Mouth – Taste, Texture, and Finish

  • Body – Light-medium, medium-full, full:
    • Pinot Noir                            Light to Medium
    • Sangiovese                           Light to Medium
    • Cabernet Franc                   Medium
    • Barbera                                 Medium
    • Zinfandel                              Medium
    • Merlot                                   Medium to Full
    • Malbec                                  Medium to Full
    • Syrah                                     Medium to Full
    • Petite Sirah                          Full
    • Cabernet Sauvignon          Full
  • Is the wine balanced?
  • Dry, off-dry, or sweet?
  • Alcohol – Prominent (riper/warmer region) or balanced (cooler climate region)
  • Tannins, if any- how heavy?
  • Length – Short, medium, or long (acidity and complexity)

Conclusion

  • What varietal could it be? Use your past tasting experiences and memory.
  •  Are there any varietals you can rule out?
  • The important part is the journey to reach a conclusion – don’t worry too much about the final guess!

The more you practice, the better you get – so cheers to that!

What’s so ‘Super’ about that Tuscan?

It is a matter of much debate who was the first to coin the now trendy moniker, although their origins are mostly attributed to the hallmark wines Tignanello and Sassicaia beginning in 1974, both marketed by Antinori. What is more clear about the history of these lovely wines is that Super Tuscans originated in Italy as wine estates aimed to make higher quality wines that didn’t necessarily fit the strict legal regulations in place for wine production as set out by the DOC.

It is hard to imagine in the relaxed landscape of California where we have some general laws about labeling appellation or varietal but otherwise are relatively free to experiment, blend, and proprietarily name to our delight. In Italy the DOC regulations mandated everything from which varietals could be grown in which regions including the strict percentages in which they must be blended (like the inclusion of white grapes in Tuscan red wine!), to precise accepted levels of alcohol, acidity, and extract as well as establishing viticultural regulations such as restrictions on yield and specific winemaking practices. These laws preserved the practices of low quality and high quantity. Wine estates that dared step outside the box were relegated to the lowest generic label of Vino da Tavola (or table wine) that had been historically the mark of bulk swill. These quality wines changed the ideology by wearing Vino da Tavola as a badge of honor, which began a revolution in Tuscan estates. With the goal of creating wines of more depth, intensity and body, estates began the previously unthinkable use of French oak barrels and blending with international varietals like Cabernet Sauvignon.

Regale Winery Super TuscanOur Regale Super Tuscan calls to mind that focus on quality that is present in all Regale Wines, and pays homage to the producers who dared to step outside the expected boundaries of the time. In classic Tignanello style, our Super Tuscan is a blend of predominantly Sangiovese with a splash of Cabernet Sauvignon. While we didn’t trek to Italy, our Super Tuscan grapes were sourced from the Napa Valley on the lower end of the Silverado Trail. With a smoky, earthy nose, ripe cherry and currant on the palate and a rich tannic finish, this wine definitely represents what you would expect from a classic Super Tuscan.

Now that you know a little more about the history of Super Tuscans, come taste at Regale to see just how super a Super Tuscan can be!

Past, Present, & Future Pinot Noir

 

The winery celebrated our 5th Anniversary this month, with a tasting of different vintages of our Estate Pinot Noir and Chardonnay to showcase the past, present and future of Regale.  It was definitely a time to reflect on how much the winery has changed over the years, and how far we have come since we began pouring tastings in the “gardens” back when it was less garden and really just more… dirt.

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From a wine standpoint, it was great to see the progression of our Estate Pinot Noir vineyard as we tasted the 2008 Estate Pinot Noir which was the first real production vintage, the 2012 which is our current vintage, and the 2014 straight from the barrel which will be bottled later this year.  The 2008 vintage, of which we were lucky enough to have a few cases left, has aged beautifully and is definitely coming into its own – a rare treat for anyone who was able to keep from drinking it over the last five years since its release. As with people, we often see when wines age they become more of what they have always been.  A mediocre wine will only stand to disappoint, while a wine with structure, complexity, and pedigree stands to become so much more.

As a few people noticed in the tasting notes, only 188 cases were produced in the 2008 vintage, while in the 2012 current vintage, there were 433 cases produced.  When talking about our Estate vineyard this is one of the most common questions that comes up – how much wine does our vineyard produce? While this should seem like an easy formula, it is in fact anything but. On average a vineyard can produce between 1 and 4+ tons of grapes per acre under vine.  Many things affect this production level including the age of the vineyard, growing conditions, pruning style, and winemaking choices.

Our Estate Pinot Noir vineyard is all hillside with 3.5 acres densely planted – about 4,000 Pinot vines in total, which are a mix of Dijon clones 115 and 777, and Pommard clone 5.  The vineyard was originally planted back in 2006 from 2 year old rootstocks which were grafted and grown in a nursery. When a vineyard is first planted, the production is limited and will increase each year until the 4th or 5th harvest when the vines reach their full potential. For example in 2007 we only harvested 1 ton for the “test” vintage, while in 2008 we were up to 4 tons and since 2010 we have been at full capacity with around 12 tons per year from the 3.5 acres under vine.  As we ponder the wines in progress, the 2013 and 2014 vintages were both stellar in the Santa Cruz Mountains, and the wines are showcasing those great growing years.

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Looking at where the winery has come from and where we are headed, we could not be more excited to see what the next 5 years hold for the winery and for the wines still to come. The past 5 years have brought dozens of amazing wines, an Estate vineyard at full production, a gorgeous winery building with manicured gardens, and myriad celebrations of all kinds. The fond memories are not only ours, but shared with our guests and extended Regale family who have, over the past five years, celebrated birthdays, marriage proposals, weddings, babies, and new friends while sipping a glass of Regale wine or relaxing in our gardens.  So here’s to our guests- for giving us a reason to make wine, and a reason to celebrate!

April News from Regale Winery

 

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Mother’s Day MarketSunday, May 03, 2015
Complimentary for Club Members

• Would you like to find the perfect gift for Mom or a special treat for yourself? Join us to sip wine and browse some beautiful one-of-a-kind items from our boutique vendors, the Sunday before Mother’s Day! A few of the vendors that will be showcasing their wares are:

  • Snake & Butterfly selling Artisan Chocolates & Confections
  • Miche Handbag selling Handbags, Albums & Crochet
  • Lauratas selling Sterling Silver & 18k Gold Designed Jewelry
  • Silpada Designs selling Sterling Silver & Brass Jewelry
  • Brix Chocolate selling Wine Pairing Chocolates
  • reWINEd Designs selling Oak Barrel Furniture & Gifts

Regale 5th Anniversary CelebrationSunday, May 10, 2015 (Mother’s Day)

1RESERVATIONS REQUIRED 

CLICK HERE to reserve tickets.

Complimentary for wine club members and their guests.  Must “purchase” (reserve) free ticket to attend.

  • Join us in celebrating an amazing 5 years! Taste wines from past vintages and barrel samples of upcoming releases to see where we have come from over the past five years and as we look toward the future.  Club member may reserve up to four tickets. Please note, you MUST “purchase” free tickets on line to attend.
  • If you have to cancel, please let us know as this will be a sold out event. All attendees must be over the age of 21.

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SAVE THE DATE:

Blind Tasting Class

June 7, 2015 from 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
$20 per person, Club Members Only
Purchase Tickets

  • Challenge your senses and test your knowledge of different varietals and growing regions through blind tasting of mystery wines.  Guess the varietal, region, and vintage in this fun and interactive tasting.

Father’s Day Jeopardy Game

June 21, 2015 • 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Complimentary for wine club members and their guests.  Must “purchase” free ticket to play. CLICK HERE to reserve tickets.

  • Think you know everything about wine, or just more than the next guy?  Join up with some friends to create a winning brain trust! Regale takes on America’s Favorite Quiz Show with a focus on wine and winemaking, challenging you with a range of questions in a fun team format. Rack up the points with your wine knowledge and then play it safe, or risk it all in Final Jeopardy. All attendees must be over the age of 21.

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PRIVATE EVENTS: 

Wine BlendingIMG_0741

  • Try your hand as a winemaker for a day. Work in teams to develop the winning Bordeaux style blend from traditional varietals: Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Cabernet Franc. Use beakers and graduated cylinders to measure the components of your concoction, tasting the myriad options as you work. Learn more about the imaginative Private Event and Team Building options we offer on our website at www.regalewine.com

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Are you Ready to Rendezvous?

3Update from Rendezvous Wine Bar Downtown Campbell

• Rendezvous “Sipping Poolside” Happy Hour flight paired with our smoked salmon bruschetta. The wine flight consists of an Italian Pinot Grigio, a Riesling from Washington, and Mount Eden Vineyard’s Chardonnay from Edna Valley, CA. Come in and try this beautiful combo!

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Regale’s Clones 4

• Learn about our new Santa Cruz Mountain Pinot Noir Blend and the cloning process in our recent blog: Clones, Clones, Everywhere “While many plants are grown via seed, wine vines are propagated via a cutting – that is taking a healthy “mother” vine and cutting a piece off.  This cutting is then planted and grows into a new vine with identical genetic material, therefore a clone of the mother vine.” 

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Facebook: Click Here

Twitter@regalewinery

Instragram: @regalewinery

Tag Us: #regalewinery

In addition to special announcements and interesting tidbits, we also feature our Blog and even some contests on social media. Be sure to check us out and become part of the conversations!

Back to our Rootstock: March

Our grape vines have settled in, confident tEstate Chardonnay Vineshat Spring is fully upon us, as they began the process of flowering.  I am sure their roots are thankful for any errant rain storms blowing through the mountains, as their leaves have truly fleshed out, soaking up the sunny days that have been far too ever-present in this multiple year drought.

After budbreak (which was quite early this year itself), the second main stage in a grape vine’s life cycle is flowering, which typically occurs after about a month of vegetative growth.  In this oddly early year, flowering began in our Estate Pinot Noir & Chardonnay vineyards in March.

Flowering VinesDuring flowering, vines develop tight bunches of tiny flowers, with each flower having the potential to form a single grape, together making up a cluster. During the flowering stage, there are a number of things that can damage the tender young shoots of our grape vines, from parasites to weather concerns of frost, wind, or excessive rain.

As the season progresses, the grape flowers will grow, and open allowing for pollination and fertilization to follow, after which the flower transforms into a grape.  Despite the early budbreak and all the concerns that come along with it, this year is still shaping up beautifully!

Back to our Rootstock: February

Pruning for our Estate Pinot Noir and Chardonnay vines began in late January, and finished by mid-February. While late pruning is better for disease resistance and can delay bud break, with the warm weather we have had thus far, vines are coming out of dormancy early so it was important to finish pruning expediently. This year properly timed pruning ended up being especially important as vineyards across California are experiencing very early bud break.

As many of you may know from your own backyard fruit trees, pruning is necessary to ensure the best quality of the fruit for the coming harvest. Each year grapevines produce new “canes” which will develop shoots to bear the fruit.  Pruning CloseupAs only one-year-old canes can bear fruit, each year we must remove older canes which no longer serve a purpose to the vine.  By making the selections about where and how we prune the vine, we will be affecting everything about how the year’s crop will develop- no pressure there! Pruning is one of the great arts of grape growing that can never be mechanized due to the precision and careful selection of each cut.

Luckily at Regale, we were fully pruned in both of our Estate vineyards before bud break! First signs of bud break come when the tiny buds on the vine start to swell, then begin to sprout shoots and eventually develop grape leaves. We always love to see some green in the vineyard, although this early in the year can be a bit nerve-wracking!  Some of our Estate Chardonnay vines in warmer spots have indeed begun to send out their leaves, as Spring is clearly upon us given the unseasonably warm and dry February we have been experiencing. If you haven’t been up to the winery lately, now is a great time to come check out the Estate Chardonnay vineyard, as vines are visible at each stage, from swollen buds all the way to actual foliage.

Budding Vine Leaf Unfurling Leafy Vine